Their Eyes Essay Final Draft
May
23
5:30 AM05:30

Their Eyes Essay Final Draft

Write an analytical essay in which you discuss how Zora Neale Hurston’s writing is both a reflection of and a departure from the ideas of the Harlem Renaissance. Include aspects of the Harlem Renaissance that you see reflected in Hurston’s writing as well as characteristics of Hurston’s writing that are departures from selected aspects of the Harlem Renaissance.

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Their Eyes Essay Rough Draft
May
16
5:30 AM05:30

Their Eyes Essay Rough Draft

Write an analytical essay in which you discuss how Zora Neale Hurston’s writing is both a reflection of and a departure from the ideas of the Harlem Renaissance. Include aspects of the Harlem Renaissance that you see reflected in Hurston’s writing as well as characteristics of Hurston’s writing that are departures from selected aspects of the Harlem Renaissance.

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Their Eyes Ch 15 & Dbl Entry Logs
May
6
5:30 AM05:30

Their Eyes Ch 15 & Dbl Entry Logs

Each week you week you will complete a double-entry journal that tracks the ways in which Zora Neal Hurston’s work is characteristic of the Harlem Renaissance as well how she departs from the Harlem Renaissance across four domains: (1)philosophy/beliefs, (2)historical context, (3)connection to arts, and (4)daily life.

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Their Eyes Ch 8 & Dbl Entry Logs
Apr
29
5:30 AM05:30

Their Eyes Ch 8 & Dbl Entry Logs

Each week you week you will complete a double-entry journal that tracks the ways in which Zora Neal Hurston’s work is characteristic of the Harlem Renaissance as well how she departs from the Harlem Renaissance across four domains: (1)philosophy/beliefs, (2)historical context, (3)connection to arts, and (4)daily life.

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Satirists - Shouts and Murmurs Analysis
Mar
11
5:00 AM05:00

Satirists - Shouts and Murmurs Analysis

The New Yorker Magazine’s “Shouts & Murmurs” section has been a source of satire since 1929, and it makes me extraordinarily happy. Your task is to choose any article that has appeared in this section of the magazine and perform an analysis to determine how the piece fits the definition of satire and what about it makes it an effective work of satire.

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Two Letters to the Editor
Feb
28
5:30 AM05:30

Two Letters to the Editor

Each student will be responsible for writing two letters to the editor in response to two other teams’ news articles/editorials. These are personal responses in the format of a persuasive letter that is intended for publishing. It will be necessary for you to read the editorials and articles of other groups to find a subject that interests you, determine the author’s position(s), and respond accordingly. Each letter should be 100-150 words in length. Effective letters to the editor must:

  • Clearly identify and respond to the author and title of the original work

  • Identify bias, slanters, and/or fallacies found in the original work

  • Clearly state and support a position in response to the original work

  • Intentionally use a fallacy (SB p 257-58). (the Magazine group will need to identify it)

Goals are to carefully read and evaluate the news and editorial content of others to identify weaknesses in argumentation or to clarify our own understanding and to develop a complete magazine section that demonstrates the results of careful research, revision, and collaboration.

Exemplary Work will have no apparent grammatical or mechanical errors and will express perspectives without ambiguity. The template of the magazine section is maintained and the work represents high quality, comprehensive contributions by the entire group.

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Final-Content Drafts (digital/all)
Feb
25
5:00 AM05:00

Final-Content Drafts (digital/all)

Each group will digitally turn in one document that includes the informational news article and all editorials. These will be shared with other groups in the coming week, and they will be scrutinizing the work of other groups for accuracy, bias, slanters, and the variety and credibility of the evidence used. This means each group must ensure this draft has all of the content of the writing present; while you will soon turn in one final version that attempts grammatical accuracy, there will be no further changes to the content allowed. Ensure that:

  • Overt bias is avoided (check pages 227-228 to review bias)

  • Slanters are not used (check pages 234-235 to review slanters)

  • A variety of evidence is used (check pages 251-252)



Goals are to develop effective editorial cartoons on a subject that thoughtfully uses analogy, parody, hyperbole or similar techniques to present an editorial position visually and to carefully revise news and editorial content to identify weaknesses in argumentation or to clarify understanding.

Exemplary Work will have no apparent grammatical or mechanical errors and will express perspectives without ambiguity.

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Two Editorial Cartoons (Per Group)
Feb
25
5:00 AM05:00

Two Editorial Cartoons (Per Group)

As a group, complete two editorial cartoons that provide an editorial perspective on your news subject. Each of these cartoons must:

  • Express a clear editorial perspective/opinion

  • Attempt to criticize a perspective/opinion on the subject so as to convince an audience

  • Use analogy, parody, hyperbole, absurdism or other techniques to convince

  • Be carefully drawn, using labels and captions to make the point clear

  • Be a collaboration between all group members (not everyone needs to draw, but everyone needs to plan/develop)

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